10 Gassy Dog Breeds – Dogs with the Worst Farts

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10 Gassy Dog Breeds – Dogs with the Worst Farts

We’ve covered everything from pocket pets to dorm pets, beautiful dogs to Velcro dogs, playful dogs to cats that act like dogs, and we want to thank YOU, our viewers for every click and subscription. YOU make it possible for us to continue to do what we love—exploring the animal kingdom for facts that we hope will enlighten you or at least entertain you.

We thought it would be awesome to let one go…so without further ado, I present to you our list of the ten gassiest dog breeds. I didn’t say this wasn’t going to stink.

10. Rottweiler

RottweilerThe Rottweiler is known as loyal companion and first-rate guard dog that will protect your family and property against intruders. Often intimidating toward strangers, this breed also has a secret weapon—a lethal fart that will clear a room faster than any bark or growl ever could.

Rottweilers tend to be predisposed to food allergies particularly in food that contains fillers and grains such as wheat, corn, soy, yeast or spices. These ingredients can cause autoimmune disorders such as stomach inflammation, irritable bowel disease and colitis. Avoid the temptation to give your Rott table scraps, especially processed or heavily seasoned food.

If your Rott develops stomach issues, low-carb, raw protein-based diet may lessen them, but be sure to consult your vet before giving your dog uncooked meat or homemade meals.

To alleviate your pup’s symptoms, feed it a hypoallergenic diet comprised of one protein and one carbohydrate for a few weeks, eventually adding other ingredients individually to determine if your dog has food allergies and which ingredients are causing them.

You may want to introduce salmon or another type fish that produces oils containing omega-3 fatty acids as their principal protein. These fish oils can help relieve stomach inflammation caused by food allergies or stomach sensitivity.

9. Boston Terrier

Boston TerrierWith its black and white tuxedo-like markings, the Boston Terrier is perhaps the snazziest of the dog breeds. In fact, it is known as the “American Gentleman.” But just like James Bond, the Boston has a secret—a smelly little secret. It farts…a lot.

As with other dogs, your Boston’s flatulence (or lack thereof) depends on what you feed him or her, and any food allergies or medical conditions they might have. But the key to what makes the breed gassier than most, is their brachycephalic skull.

Bostons have short, broad skulls, and short noses that make them prone to aerophagia, a condition that causes them to swallow large amounts of air when they eat. All that air has to go somewhere, so these dapper darlings just make like Elsa and “let it go” whenever and wherever they please.

Although there is nothing you can do to change your Boston’s bone structure, you can tweak their diet to make sure their meals are low in fats and carbs, and contain plenty of soluble fiber for regularity. But there is no “one-size fits all” diet that will work for all Bostons, or any dog for that matter. It will take a lot of patience, and trial and error to figure out what foods your pup can and cannot tolerate.

What does work across the board is exercise. Make sure your dog gets plenty of physical activity. Just like a long walk or jog can help “move things along” for us humans, the same is true for our four-legged friends.

8. Beagle

BeagleMost of us were first introduced to the Beagle through Snoopy, from the comic strip, Peanuts. Loyal, funny and more intelligent than most humans, Snoopy is arguably more popular than his beloved bestie, Charlie Brown. But who could have guessed that the reason Woodstock flies upside-down is that she gets caught down wind of Snoopy’s toots and is carried away, “gone with the wind”—literally.

Although your Beagle’s flatulence can be set off by any number of foods, there are a few that seem to be more difficult for the breed to digest. Corn and broccoli are high on the list of vittles that both humans and dogs find difficult to digest. Many owners say liver treats wreak havoc on their Beagles’ digestive tracts, and rawhides can also cause problems when they break off in large chunks that have not been chewed, resulting in intestinal blockage. They are also put together and sealed with an adhesive toxic chemical that can cause a dog to be gassy and have loose stools. Treats like knuckle bones or sweet potato chews may be viable alternatives.

But all other possible causes aside, the Beagle’s lifestyle is probably the most likely cause of any gastric distress they might experience. Beagles are mischievous, shameless, and always ready to rock. The faster they can scarf down their meals, be it from their bowl, or scraps from the garbage, the faster they can dash to the next adventure. We all know what happens when we eat things we’re not supposed to. And when we eat too fast, too much air is swallowed and that trapped air must be expelled…by any means necessary.

Do you have any funny dog fart stories? Let’s all have a chuckle in the comments.

7. American Pit Bull Terrier

American Pit Bull TerrierThe Pitbull Terrier has a often unfounded reputation as being one of the most aggressive and dangerous dog breeds around. But the truth is, Pit Bulls pose a danger to other animals and people only when they’re trained to. The most naturally dangerous thing about a Pibble is well, their farts…they can be silent but deadly.

Pitbulls are prone to gassiness not because they are Pitbulls, but because of their “go getter” temperament that even affects the way they eat—they “go get” their meals very quickly, gulping down lots of air with their food.

If your Pit is plowing through meals at record pace, you may want to purchase a slow down dog dish. These dishes feature dividers that separate meals into sections that your dog will have to navigate. The bowl will become a puzzle that stimulates them mentally, while keeping them from swallowing their food too quickly.

Of course, allergies, parasites, and medical issues are all possible culprits when it comes to any digestive issues your little buddy might have. Pay close attention to what your dog eats, how they eat, and any symptoms they exhibit. Your vet will appreciate any information you can provide to help identify and solve your pup’s problem.

6. Mastiff

MastiffOne of the oldest dog breed types, the massive Mastiff was once known as a vicious war dog. Today’s Mastiff is a gentle giant that will protect its family at all costs, although it rarely has to use force to ward off intruders. Its size is enough to strike fear in the heart of anyone who poses a threat to its family. The original “atomic dog,” the Mastiff brings the thunder wherever it goes, and sometimes that thunder comes in the form of a fart that has the potential to level buildings.

All jokes aside, the Mastiff is a breed that is especially susceptible to Gastric Torsion, or bloat, a potentially fatal condition that affects big, deep chested dogs. This ailment occurs when the stomach is filled with gas or air and then twists on itself, preventing the dog from burping or vomiting to get rid of the air, and restricting the blood flow to the heart.

Eating or drinking too rapidly, or eating one large meal a day can cause bloat. It can also be caused by strenuous exercise after eating. Symptoms include a swollen abdomen, rapid heart rate, excessive drooling, lethargy, restlessness, and gagging without throwing up. If your dog is experiencing these signs, take them to the vet immediately.

5. Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire TerrierYorkshire Terriers are cute, petite, and oh so sweet, but don’t let the toy dog classification fool ya…these precious pups don’t play around. They can produce stink bombs that are downright lethal.

So what makes these cuties so pooty? Other than the typical causes of gassiness in canines, many Yorkies suffer from medical conditions like portosystemic shunts, that compromise their digestive systems.

Ideally, the blood supply that drains the intestines flows from the heart through the portal vein, is filtered in the liver, then flows back to the heart through the caudal vena cava. A portosystemic shunt (PSS) is an irregular vein that connects the blood supply returning from the intestines to the vein recirculating blood to the heart, bypassing (or shunting) the liver altogether.

Signs that your Yorkie may have PSS include vomiting, diarrhea, increased thirst and urination, weight loss, drooling and difficulty urinating. They may also have neurological symptoms such as seizures, blindness, and circling—or no symptoms at all. PSS can be fatal if left untreated, so if you suspect that your furbaby may have it, consult your veterinarian.

4. German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherd DogGerman Shepherds are known for being intelligent, strong, and courageous. But did you know that behind their tough exterior, lies a sensitive interior that is vulnerable to many health issues, including several gastric maladies that can cause gassiness?

One such illness is Endocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency, or EPI, which happens when the pancreas fails to produce enough digestive enzymes. If your dog has EPI, it cannot absorb nutrients from the food it eats. So even if it is eating a healthy diet, without proper medical attention it can starve to death.

Symptoms of EPI include extreme hunger and weight loss despite eating regularly, eating strange things (like poop), frequent bowel movements, runny or yellow stools, and of course—flatulence.

Have your Shepherd’s blood tested whenever it has a lengthy digestive problem, especially if it starts to lose weight. If your pup has EPI, treatment may consist of a special diet, antibiotics, vitamins, and enzyme supplements.

3. Bulldog

BulldogCoincidentally, our number three gassy breed, the Bulldog, happens to be a triple threat. Bulldogs of all types fart a lot because they have trouble digesting many foods. They also enjoy food so much that they find it hard to pace themselves when eating and don’t know how to react when they realize they’ve bitten off more than they can chew. And they have that flat, brachycephalic facial structure that forces them to take in too much air while eating.

To keep your Bulldog from “raising the roof,” stick to a strict diet that limits carbohydrates, fermentable foods, low quality dog food and table scraps. Another culprit that can ruin both your day and your dog’s is lactose. Most Bulldogs, and many humans are intolerant of dairy products, like milk, ice cream and cheese, which contain lactose.

To keep your pup from making meals disappear like a magician, try a “slow-down” doggy dish or place a tennis ball in the center of a dish. This will force your furbaby to eat around the ball, and in effect, eat slower.

As a last resort, try Anti-Fart Snacks. Yep, that’s right—Anti-Fart Snacks. They may sound like a dessert you see in a cartoon, but they do exist. These cookies, are filled with fiber, certain enzymes and nutrients that help reduce gas and malodorous melodies. I’ve put an affiliate link in the description. I do get a small commision if you purchase from Amazon using the link, so you’re also helping to support my channel.

2. Pug

PugPugs are arguably the gassiest of the small dog breeds, consistently producing some of the most putrid poots known to man—or dog. Pugs not only pass gas frequently, but forcefully, sometimes startling themselves with their own farts.

We won’t bore you by listing the common causes of doggy flatulence once again, and ways to reduce it, but we will tell you that since the Pug is small, brachycephalic, and loves to eat, that it was a shoe-in for one of the top spots. And, if you do the math, it’s really quite simple to figure out one of the main reasons Pugs are so gassy—they take large amounts of air and food into their tiny bodies, and well…it has to go somewhere!

1. Boxer

BoxerNo one for knows for certain how the Boxer got its name, but we’re betting that it had something to do with the fact that the Boxer’s butt bombs will KNOCK. YOU. OUT.

Boxer gas can be blamed on all the usual suspects (diet, aerophagia, parasites, viruses, and medical conditions) but there is one issue that is especially troublesome for Boxers—constipation. Food that sits decomposing in the intestines can give your dog terrible bouts of gas, especially when they try to force a bowel movement by straining.

Bloat is also very common in Boxers, as is gastrointestinal neoplasia, a form of cancer. If your BFF is scratching and licking itself, or vocalizing, is suffering from constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, abnormal bowel movements, dehydration, dry mouth, poor appetite, weight loss or abdominal swelling, contact your vet immediately.

Some digestive problems stem from an imbalance of “good” and “bad” bacteria in a dog’s intestines. Plain unsweetened yogurt is a great way to add good bacteria, or probiotics, to your dog’s digestive system. Pineapple, which contains the enzyme Bromelain, may also be a great way to reduce gas because it aids in the breakdown of proteins. And if your dog is partial to eating poop, the bromelain in pineapple may also be helpful in curbing its compulsion to chow down on “previously processed” goodies.

What foods give your dog gas and how do you manage it?

Well, I hope that didn’t stink too much.