Shiba Inu Vs Corgi – Which is Better? Dog vs Dog

Shiba Inu Vs Corgi – Which is Better? Dog vs Dog

Shiba Inu vs Corgi – Which is Better? These small dog breeds are quite similar in size, weight, and cuteness, and they are both extremely popular on the Internet. But you want to know more than just who can win an Internet popularity contest don’t you? Let’s examine the Shiba Inu and the Corgi and decide which may be a better pet for you.

While there are, in fact, two Corgi breeds: Pembroke Welsh Corgi and Cardigan Welsh Corgi, in this video we focus mostly on the Pembroke Welsh Corgi since they are more popular. But much of the information applies to both breeds.

History

Shiba InuThe bloodline of the Shiba Inu goes back to 300 B.C., when there were six breeds of dogs named after the regions of Japan from which they originated. It is a basal breed whose job was to hunt small game in the brush. As a matter of fact, the word “shiba” means brushwood and “inu” is the Japanese word for dog.

In the first two decades of the 20th century, shibas were nearly rendered extinct due to crossbreeding. But, through the efforts of hunters and preservationists, they were spared the death knell for a brief period. During World War II they faced extinction again, due to a food shortage, and yet again during a distemper epidemic in the 1950s. In the aftermath of these crises, the three surviving lines were crossbred, resulting in the version of the Shiba Inu that exists today.

Although this breed was introduced to the U.S. in 1954 by a military family, the first litter wasn’t born until 1979. In 1993, the Shiba Inu was recognized by the American Kennel Club.

Pembroke Welsh CorgiThe lineage of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi goes as far back as 1107 A.D. It is believed that they were brought to Wales by Flemish weavers who settled there. They were originally bred to herd horses and livestock. Corgis are celebrated as the favorite breed of Queen Elizabeth II. She enjoys their companionship so much that she has owned more than 30 during her reign.

At present, corgis are gaining popularity in the U.S., but are considered “vulnerable” in the United Kingdom. The downward trend is thought to be caused by a 2007 ban on tail clipping and a shortage of breeders in the U.K. In 2014, the corgi was placed on the AKC ‘s “Vulnerable Native Breeds” list when the number of registered dogs dipped to less than 300. The breed was dropped from the “At Risk” list in December 2017 when 456 pups were registered.

Size and Appearance

Shiba InuThe Shiba Inu is the smallest of the six original Japanese dog breeds. Males range in height from 14 to 17 inches, while females tend to be slightly smaller, 13 to 16 inches. It has a stocky, athletic build and its facial features are very similar to those of a fox.
The Shiba has a short, “double coat” of fur. The outer coat is coarse and straight, with guard hairs that protect the skin and are rain and snow repellent. The undercoat is soft, thick and serves as a barrier to frigid winter temperatures, as does its tail, which it curls up to cover its face and nose while sleeping. Shibas have a grey, buff or cream undercoat with an outercoat that is black and tan, red, or sesame (black-tipped red fur).

Pembroke Welsh CorgiSometimes, big things come in small packages and the corgi is the perfect example of this. A “true dwarf” breed right down to its name (Corgi means “dwarf dog” in Welsh), the average corgi stands 10 to 12 inches, with males weighing in at 27 to 30 pounds and females weighing about 25-28 pounds. It is long like the dachshund and has short, muscular legs and a thick chest.

Like the Shiba, the facial structure and ears of the corgi are similar to those of a fox. Their coats are prone to excessive shedding and come in red, fawn, sable and black and tan, sometimes with splashes of white interspersed throughout.

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Temperament and Family Life

Shiba InuThe Shiba Inu is known for its bold, independent demeanor. Although it is loyal and affectionate to those who reciprocate that loyalty and affection, they can be guarded when dealing with strangers, and aggressive toward other canines. They are also quite possessive when it comes to their food, toys and territory.

When a shiba is unhappy or stressed, it will let out a loud, high-pitched “shiba scream.” It will also make the same sound when it is very excited or happy.

Shibas take pride in their cleanliness and constantly self-groom to maintain an unsoiled coat. Their compulsive nature makes house-training easy. If their human takes them outside after meals and naps, some pups will even train themselves.

Pembroke Welsh CorgiCorgis are very affectionate in general, love to socialize with other pets and are eager to please their humans. Their desire to please combined with their exceptional intelligence, makes them ready and willing to learn, and easy to train.

Natural-born herders, corgis are compelled to chase anything that moves, so they should be confined when not being walked. Their inclination to herd may also incite some young corgis to nip at their humans’ ankles. While they are pups, it is very important to encourage socialization with humans and other animals, in order to discourage aggression and anti-social behavior.

Trainability and Intelligence

Shiba InuAlthough highly intelligent, Shibas have a reputation for being one of the most difficult breeds to train. They are quick learners but are stubborn, independent, and want to do things their own way, so training requires plenty of patience.

Shiba humans must pay attention to their dog’s preferences and develop personalized training plans to suit their needs. One method is to use a bit of psychology to make the Shiba think that obedience training is his or her idea.
Aversion training should be avoided. Trust will be broken and the strong-willed Shiba will respond aggressively to this type of training. They will not give up, nor back down.

Pembroke Welsh CorgiCorgis are also highly intelligent, intuitive and independent. If not trained properly, they will take advantage of the situation and assert themselves as the dominant species.

That said, it is imperative that the roles in the relationship be established in a firm, but affectionate manner so that the dog is able to retain some of its independence.

The trusting, eager to please nature of the corgi makes them fairly easy to train. They will do whatever it takes to earn praise from their humans, so positive reinforcement is a great training technique for this breed. Corgis also love to be the center of attention. As long as all eyes are on them, they don’t mind performing a task or doing a new trick.

Which do you think is a more desirable trait in a dog? A strong will or the constant need for attention?

Exercise Needs

Shiba InuShiba Inus are a moderately active breed that adapts well to different active lifestyles. In addition to being walked daily, they respond well to hiking, playing ball, slow jogging and climbing stairs, but of course, the exercise plan will vary depending on the disposition and energy level of the Shiba.

Since they are inclined to seek prey, it is very important to keep the Shiba on a simple leash when walking or hiking. If it is particularly excitable, a harness might be a more useful restraint.

Since Welsh Corgis were bred to herd, they need plenty of exercise to burn excess energy, and keep their minds occupied. They are also prone to excessive weight gain, so regular exercise is a must in order to avoid spinal problems caused by the strain of too much weight being carried under a long back.

In addition to regular walks, Corgis should be taken out at least twice a day for strenuous activities such as jogging, running alongside a bike or on a treadmill, playing fetch or playdates with dog pals—sans leash.

“An idle mind is the devil’s workshop.” It is imperative that both Shiba Inus and Corgis get sufficient exercise to deter them from chewing household items and digging up soil.

Health and Lifespan

Shibas are a particularly healthy breed overall and they have an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years. But like any other breed, they are vulnerable to certain diseases and infirmities.

Common health issues include eye disorders such as glaucoma, cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy. To be sure that there are no eye existing eye problems, it is important for Shiba Inus to visit the ophthalmologist regularly. Hip and knee conditions like hip dysplasia and patellar luxation, are also ailments that are seen more frequently in Shiba Inus than in other breeds, as is chylothorax (the accumulation of fluid in the chest cavity).

Female Shibas that have not been spayed are susceptible to pyometra, a serious bacterial infection of the uterus. Although this infection can occur in any female dog, it is seen more often in Shibas. Therefore, Shiba owners who do not plan to breed their females should be sure to have them spayed.

Pembroke Welsh CorgiIn general, Corgis are not prone to poor health and their average lifespan is 12 to 15 years, but their physicality makes them more likely to develop certain afflictions related to their short legs and lengthy spine.

Back conditions in any breed can be catastrophic. It is important that afflictions such as progressive spinal degenerative myelopathy and intervertebral disc disease be treated quickly, so that the Corgi’s quality of life is affected as little as possible. Like the Shiba, eye problems such as cataracts and retinal dysplasia (a condition in which the retina can detach causing complete blindness) are very common in Corgis.

Other health problems unique to Corgis include Von Willebrand Disease (a blood disease similar to hemophilia that occurs in humans), cutaneous asthenia (a condition that causes the skin to lose its elasticity) and patent ductus arteriosus (a vascular system disorder in which unoxygenated blood bypasses the lungs).
With proper diagnosis, patent ductus arteriosus can be surgically corrected.

Now that you’ve mulled over a blow by blow comparison of the Shiba Inu and Pembroke Welsh Corgi, which one of these amazing breeds best suits your lifestyle, “knocking out” the other to win this edition of “Dog vs Dog?”

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